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INTRODUCTION
When we hear the words “human rights” a resounding “Yes!” echos in the chambers of our mind, thinking it to be an outstanding thing for all of humanity.  In this we are not wrong, but only lack basic understanding of the problems encountered when attempts made to place these words into action go unfulfilled.  Provided below are three articles to increase understanding of what the United Nations and its agencies faces, along with national entities and their institutions, in their attempts to realize human rights at ‘ground zero’.  Perhaps you can help to reconcile these long-standing issues so that the process can move to a fruitful conclusion. Some information may be outdated, but problems remain unresolved. Provide your comments below.

NOTES ON HUMAN RIGHTS:
Reason for the United Nations not being an enforcer of human rights

"The UN system is not structurally or psychologically geared to deliver on human rights promises – other than by setting up institutions independent of its internal politics, which might make adjudicative decisions which require the enforcement powers of the Security Council to be deployed against states which do not accept adjudication. Any such system would challenge both the shibboleth of the sovereignty of nation states, and the obsessive neutrality ingrained in UN personnel and procedures. Obeisance to member-state sovereignty is the UN's systemic defect, and it accounts for the pathetic performance of the Human Rights Commission and that toothless tribunal, the Human Rights Committee. If the promises of the Universal Declaration are to be realized, we must look to bodies independent of the UN, to regional treaty systems and their courts, to forge an international human rights law sufficiently understood and respected to be enforced in municipal courts throughout the world."

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The point expressed in Comments on Human Rights is "that this idea of rights that enable the fulfillment of duties is available as a way to bring a conception of individual rights within a non-individualistic outlook, and thus to dampen the tension between the idea of human rights as a shared point of view and the idea of human rights as assigning rights to individuals."

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Minimalism About Human Rights: The Most We Can Hope For? By Joshua Cohen, MIT
"The route I have in mind begins with an emphasis on the value of toleration and an embrace of ethical pluralism and ends in human rights minimalism. Ignatieff offers a crisp statement of the argument, when he says that: “The universal commitments implied by human rights can be compatible with a wide variety of ways of living only if the universalism implied is self-consciously minimalist. Human rights can command universal assent only as a decidedly ‘thin’ theory of what is right, a definition of the minimal conditions for any life at all.” If human rights are to apply to all, as basic demands on social and political arrangements, then it seems desirable that they be acceptable to all. And if we want them to be acceptable to all, then—in view of the wide range of religious, philosophical, ethical, political outlooks that are now endorsed in different societies, and that we can expect to persist into the indefinite future—the content cannot be very demanding, perhaps no more than a statement of the protections required “for any life at all.”

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